The cold can bite you

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We really got to appreciate elder George’s words when we took the opportunity to go out onto the land with a local friend, Ipeelie Ootoova, on Saturday. He took us north-east of CHARS, over the ice for a little over 20 km, in a skidoo drawn Qamutiik (Inuit sled) lined with furs. Lucky for us, we set off on one of the coldest days we had seen in Cambridge Bay thus far.

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The cold can bite you big time if you are not prepared

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cold winds blowing as we set out with ipeelie

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ipeelie after the first stretch of the trip

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the route we travelled with ipeelie

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The night before, Ipeelie had gone out to his family cabin and turned on the gas stove. We were so happy to take a break to warm up there after a cold 30 minutes in a bumpy Qamutiik. 

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ipeelie’s cabin

The cozy, warm insides of Ipeelie’s cabin were a welcoming refuge from the cold outside

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Ipeelie shared some of his knowledge about local hunting practices. Originally from Pond Inlet, Nunavut, he told us that he and his family are more experienced with hunting marine animals such as Narwhals but also share similar hunting practices to the locals in Cambridge Bay that hunt caribou, muskox, and polar bear. 

We were very impressed to find out that Ipeelie is also an Inuk actor involved in the filming industry since 2009. He was nominated for best Actor Award for his role NATAK in Maïna at the American Indian Film Festival.

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